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Tennessee parents angry after school textbooks justify Palestinian suicide bombings

By Mason White 2:29 PM April 29, 2013
The book in question 

By: David Ross
(Scroll down for video) Tennessee parents are fuming after learning that school textbooks justify Palestinian suicide bombings in Israel.

Some parents in Williamson County, Tennessee, are calling for the removal of the high school textbook, believing that it is biased against Israel.

The textbook is taught on a college level elective course called Human Geography, and is available to students in public schools in Williamson County, which also offer an elective course on the Bible.

Parents are against the kind of questions that the book is encouraging teens to ask. One of the book’s questions is: “If a Palestinian suicide bomber kills dozens of Israeli teenagers in a restaurant in Jerusalem, is it an act of terrorism or a war against the policies of the Israeli government?”

Julie West, a mother of a 15-year-old student at Franklin High School in Franklin, Tennessee, said the question is pro-Palestinian.

“We are living in a time where people say: ‘How can someone put a bomb outside a restaurant or on a street with the intention of killing innocent people?’ And we wonder why, when at the same time we are teaching our children a curriculum that suggests it could be fine, or at least it might be okay if these children are Jewish,” West said.

Laurie Cardoza-Moore, head of a pro Israeli group, said: “the book is anti-Semitic.”
Cardoza-Moore said that the book aims to delegitimize the right of the Jewish people to the Holy Land.

“I am shocked that such a book even exists in the U.S. It should be illegal. What is it doing in a school in Tennessee? This book seems more fitting for some radical country located thousands of miles away from the U.S.” Jerold Peralta, of Scottsdale, Arizona told YourJewishNews.com after learning about the book.

“I think it’s a slippery slope to go down if we start banning books, because people have opposing views,” county schools Superintendent Mike Looney said. “I think the fundamental question to be answered is: Does the book create an opportunity for students to engage in deep dialogue about important issues in the world? I think it does,” Looney added.Mobile video not loading? Click here to view